The F Dominant 7th Piano Chord:

There are many different ways to play the F7 piano chord. Press either of the "rotate notes" buttons to see different ways of voicing the F7 piano chord. Press either of the "change octave" buttons to see the F7 piano chord in different octaves. In the diagram below, you will only find the right hand notes. The bass (left hand note) is simply the root of the chord (F). If you listen while the chord plays, you can hear that the bass note stays consistant while the top notes are changing.

F dominant 7th

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Major Third

The major third of a F dominant 7th piano chord (A) is up 4 half-steps from the root (F).

To find the major third:
Skip three half-steps up from the root (F) and land on the fourth half-step (A).

Start on:

  • The root of the chord (F)

Skip three half-steps:

  • Gb
  • G
  • Ab

And land on the fourth half-step:

  • the major third of the chord (A)

The Minor Seventh

The minor seventh (bottom note shown in red) is down two half-steps from the root. Skip one key down (to the left) from the root, F to find the minor seventh (Eb).
If you start on F, skip E and land on Eb.
 

Related Scale:

The F Mixolydian Scale

root second third fourth fifth sixth seventh octave

F

G

A

Bb

C

D

Eb

F

Seventh chords are chords that are built with four notes from the scale: the root, third, fifth and seventh. Notice that you just skip every other note to create seventh chords. I think an easier way to think of them is to think of the seventh not as the fourth note away from the root (to the right), but rather right next to the root in the next octave lower. Because the notes repeat as you move up and down the piano, the seventh (Eb) is not just the seventh note up from F in the F mixolydian scale, as you move from left to right on the piano, but it's also the note next to it in the scale if you are moving from right to left. If you look at the diagram at the top of the page, you'll see that I put the seventh below the third, and I leave out the fifth.

Another great short-cut for seventh chords: since the fifth is optional, you can think of seventh chords as cluster of notes close together: the seventh, root (played down an octave or two in the left hand) and the third. The biggest advantage is the relationship between the seventh and the root is much easier to understand if you think down from the root (to the left) rather than up to the root (to the right), since the distance is only a second, instead of a seventh.

Triads:

  • Major - Root, M3, 5 (F, A and C)
  • minor - Root, m3, 5 (F, Ab and C)
  • Augmented (Aug) - Root, M3, A5 (F, A and Db)
  • diminished (dim) - Root, m3, d5 (F, Ab and B)

Seventh Chords:

  • 7 - Root, M3, 5, m7 (F, A, C and Eb)
  • M7 - Root, M3, 5, M7 (F, A, C and E)
  • m7 - Root, m3, 5, m7 (F, Ab, C and Eb)
  • dim7 - Root, m3, d5, d7 (F, Ab, B and D)
  • half dim7 (same as "m7b5") - Root, m3, flat 5, m7 (F, Ab, B and Eb)

You can see how important a good grasp of intervals can be to understanding chord structure and theory. Luckily, if you are shaky on your intervals, you can practice with my musical interval trainer.


Go back to the list of 72 essential piano chords

Piano Chord Tools

Test Your Piano Chord Knowledge
Flash-based piano chord finder
My most popular piano chords video from YouTube
48 piano chords in two mintes eleven seconds
My YouTube Piano Chords Channel
The "two-five" piano chord pattern animated
The "two-five" piano chord pattern animated with 9ths and flat 9ths
Using fourths to find piano chords -- part 1
Using fourths to find piano chords -- part 2
List of 72 basic piano chords
Printable piano chord chart
Minor thirds and how they relate to diminished chords

Ear Training Tools

Learn to hear half-steps and whole-steps
Study solfeggio with a randomly generated melody (easy)
Study solfeggio with a randomly generated melody (hard)
Musical interval training

Note and Rhythm Tools

Test Your Knowledge of the Note Names on the Piano
Learn the Lines of the Treble Clef and the Lines of the Bass Clef
Learn the Spaces of the Treble Clef and the Spaces of the Bass Clef
Practice Sight Reading in Both Clefs by Simply Typing the Name of the Note
Memorize the note names of the lines above and below the staff in both treble and bass clef
Practice sight-reading treble clef notes
Practice sight-reading bass clef notes
Practice sight-reading with the "Alien Note Killer" game
interval shapes for sight-reading
Learn rhythm videos

C Piano Chords

Piano chords with a root of C are down a fourth or up a fifth from piano chords with a root of F.

C major (C)
C minor (Cm)
C major 7th (CM7)
C minor 7th (Cm7)
C dominant 7th (C7)
C diminished 7th (Cdim7)

Test Your Knowledge of C Piano Chords

See a Longer List of C Piano Chords


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Playing F7 Piano Chords from a Fake Book:

These are general guidelines and not hard-and-fast rules.

Generally, the idea is to supply the missing notes underneath the melody note. By "underneath" I mean to the left of melody note on the piano, or lower in pitch.

F7 with the root (F) in the melody

If the melody note is the root of the chord (F), play the following notes underneath the melody:

  • the third (A)
  • the seventh (Eb)

Right click on the image to zoom in/out.

F7 with the third (A) in the melody

If the melody note is the third of the chord (A), play the following notes underneath the melody:

  • the seventh (G)

Right click on the image to zoom in/out.

F7 with the fifth (C) in the melody

If the melody note is the fifth of the chord (C), play the following notes underneath the melody:

  • the third (A)
  • the seventh (Eb)

Right click on the image to zoom in/out.

F7 with the seventh (Eb) in the melody

If the melody note is the seventh of the chord (Eb), play the following notes underneath the melody:

  • the third (A)

Right click on the image to zoom in/out.

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Piano Chord Progressions that use the F7 chord

The F7 chord is the five dominant chord in the iim7, V7, I progression in the key of Bb

The F7 chord is the five dominant chord in the vim7, iim7, V7, I progression in the key of Bb

The F7 chord is the two dominant chord in the vim7, II7, V7, I progression in the key of Eb

The F7 chord is the two dominant chord in the VI7, II7, V7, I progression in the key of Eb

The F7 chord is the six dominant chord in the VI7, II7, V7, I progression in the key of Ab